Category Archives: Person-centred working

Podcast Episode 017: Sue Jugon Interview Part 1

TheStrengthsRevolution_albumart_2-2An interview with Sue Jugon exploring the influences on her practice as a mental health nurse, team and service manager. Looking at the early influences of growing up in a farming background, and coming into nursing from initial experiences within learning disability services.

A strong emphasis emerges about taking opportunities to have a go at things, without being constrained by the possibilities of failure. Sue is a person for whom working with the most vulnerable people is a life-long passion, and her career path has never deviated from the values and principles that remain focused on the needs of the most vulnerable.

She also talks about her own continuing aspirations, and a natural talent for exploring the playing of different musical instruments. Above all else, it is the love of her children that keeps her focused on who she is, and continues to bring out the best of a dedicated person.

For the full content of this episode click on the follow links to iTunes and Sound Cloud (or go to Stitcher Radio):

https://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/strengths-revolution-steve/id867043694

https://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/017-sue-jugon-interview-part-1/id867043694?i=316896842&mt=2

Advertisements

Podcast Episode 014: Steve Onyett Interview Part 2

TheStrengthsRevolution_albumart_2-2In Part 2 of this extensive interview Steve Onyett explores his work interests and influences. With a focus on the current challenging and exciting times faced by health and social care services he discusses ideas around leadership, the role that solution focused approaches have played in his practice as well as development of others, and the ‘bonkers’ nature of the system that has emerged across the last couple of decades.

In relation to the priorities of the ‘system’ the question arises as to whether there is a place for the Sacred Fools to make a real impact? As for the next steps in his journey he explores the importance to him of becoming involved in the ‘Way of Council’ approach to personal development, and also outlines the true meaning of listening as he explores the idea of ‘listening from the heart’.

Steve embodies an excellent example of how and why we should honour both our ancestors as great influences on our own development, but also our successors through our care for the planet and the legacy we pass on to the next generation.

For the full content of this episode click on the links to iTunes and Sound Cloud (or go to Stitcher Radio):

https://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/strengths-revolution-steve/id867043694

https://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/014-steve-onyett-interview/id867043694?i=315887798&mt=2

 

Podcast Episode 013: Steve Onyett Interview Part 1

TheStrengthsRevolution_albumart_2-2Professor Steve Onyett reflects on the values that have influenced his work and personal development across the last 30 years, including where those values have emerged from. He identifies two particular people who have been influential, one specifically on his professional roles in mental health services, and the other offering him a mentoring role in his development as a spiritual being.

Steve is a well respected facilitator, coach, researcher and writer, but this interview also explores his aspirations in areas of environmental activism and the wider humanistic approach to personal development and his desire to support others. He is particularly engaged in the ‘Way of Council’, and the idea of a deeper ‘listening from the heart’.

For the full content of this episode click on the following links to iTunes and Sound Cloud (or go to Stitcher Radio):

https://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/strengths-revolution-steve/id867043694

https://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/013-steve-onyett-interview/id867043694?i=315557844&mt=2

Podcast Episode 008: Satsanga and Anna

TheStrengthsRevolution_albumart_2-2An interview with Satsanga (Lawrence Borish) where he details the story of Anna, a client from the early days of his Social Work career, and the challenges of supporting Anna to achieve her dreams within a system that unintentionally institutionalises people. The case study illustrates how a strengths approach can be put into practice, and the challenges and risks that have to be overcome in order to support people in a genuinely person-centred way.

The full content of this episode is available on iTunes at the following links (and on Stitcher Radio and Sound Cloud):

https://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/strengths-revolution-steve/id867043694

https://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/008-satsanga-and-anna/id867043694?i=313414010&mt=2

Does the whole picture fit together?

AoCC 2009

This question captures the meaning of ‘care coordination’. Are all the elements coming together in a coordinated sequence or pattern? It is a question that we apply to many aspects of our daily lives. We ask it, for example, about the colour schemes and fittings of interior design; the layout of an exhibition or gallery; the clothing we wear in particular situations. Simplicity and straight lines in a map or set of instructions often seem to help us to understand what we are doing, where we are going and how we can get there more easily. Complex pictures and plans might please people who enjoy the challenge of working out puzzles rather than having the solution given to them but, depending on how much time you have and what kind of person you are, high levels of complexity may serve only to frustrate you and turn you off.

The degree of creativity experienced in the smallest to the most complex of mental health tasks will largely be influenced by the attitudes, feelings and personal values that are in play at the time. For example, the simple task of arranging an appointment, and then attending it, might just be part of what a particular person does, and they might do it methodically, with little or no thought. But even a simple task like this can be subject to enormous influences, such as the availability of rooms, effective computer systems, clarity of communication, motivation to attend and transport on the day. Failure to meet the appointment, for whatever reason, has the potential to cause frustrations, fuelling deeper tensions and attributions of blame. But the successful completion of a simple task like this rarely generates the positive feelings that perhaps it deserves. Not all appointments and methods of support are creative, passionate and artful events; but the message is that we need to be more reflective about the smaller details if we are to derive more pleasure from our work routines. This message applies to all practitioners involved in care and support, as the care coordinator occupies a role of supervising the whole picture, not painting the whole picture alone!

Successfully coordinated care and support can be a great source of satisfaction and pleasure for providers and receivers alike. See the ‘Art of Coordinating Care’ manual for a detailed approach to capturing the creativity in the role.