Tag Archives: Strengths approach

FREE ‘Strengths’ Resources

Steve Morgan (Practice Based Evidence) presents: Working with Strengths

Click on the following link to find out more about my 8-point Strengths Checklist, and a range of other resources:

https://positiverisktaking.lpages.co/working-with-strengths/

I have been developing and delivering a Strengths Approach since it was first formally introduced to me by Professor Charlie Rapp in 1991. It has been without doubt the most exciting and influential set of ideas I have experienced throughout a long and varied career; and expanded further through my reading around the Gallup organisation strengths literature.

I now offer FREE access to ideas that will help you identify and work with your own strengths. Whether it is our own personal development, or that of others around us, it shouldn’t be a secret as to how we can become more of who we really are.

Best wishes,

Steve Morgan

Practice Based Evidence & The Strengths Revolution.

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Strengths Principles

A strengths approach is underpinned by 6 principles. In this video I present these as a way of helping us understand why and how we should think and act more from a strengths based perspective.

 

Use the following link to also access a free training webinar which introduces my simple 5-step process to risk decision-making, which also form the core modules of the Positive Risk-Taking Membership Site:

https://app.webinarjam.net/register/21360/99e6026a97

Why work with strengths?

Marilyn vos Savant said “Success is achieved by developing our strengths, not by eliminating our weaknesses.” Strengths and weaknesses are not mutually exclusive, but in this video I offer 5 reasons why we should focus more on our strengths.

 

Use the following link to also access a free training webinar which introduces my simple 5-step process to risk decision-making, which also form the core modules of the Positive Risk-Taking Membership Site:

https://app.webinarjam.net/register/21360/99e6026a97

What is needed to deliver positive risk-taking? [2]

Positive risk-taking is a challenging area of practice, so it should ideally be seen as a collective activity, not just the duty of individuals. In this video I explore what teams need in order to develop their risk decision-making practice.

 

Use the following link to also access a free training webinar which introduces my simple 5-step process to risk decision-making, which also form the core modules of the Positive Risk-Taking Membership Site:

https://app.webinarjam.net/register/21360/99e6026a97

What is needed to deliver positive risk-taking? [1]

Positive risk-taking does not happen just by chance. It is a carefully thought through process of information gathering, analysis and decision-making. In this first of three videos I outline what we need as individual practitioners to give us confidence to engage in the process.

 

Use the following link to also access a free training webinar which introduces my simple 5-step process to risk decision-making, which also form the core modules of the Positive Risk-Taking Membership Site:

https://app.webinarjam.net/register/21360/99e6026a97

What is a Strengths Approach?

We often get caught up in the confusion and the nuances of language. In this video I explore a clearer understanding of a Strengths Approach in practice.

 

Use the following link to also access a free training webinar which introduces my simple 5-step process to risk decision-making, which also form the core modules of the Positive Risk-Taking Membership Site:

https://app.webinarjam.net/register/21360/99e6026a97

Positive Risk-Taking & Dementia-Friendly Communities

JRF screenshotThe increasing incidence of dementia, and profile it is gaining in the public imagination, means that this is a condition that none of us can ignore. What role might a strengths approach have to play in the way we view people living with dementia? It is all too easy to see the negatives and deficits around someone living with dementia, and to remain oblivious to their capabilities and potential, as well as the supportive resources they have around them. Just because you have a particular label doesn’t mean you have lost all capacity to dream and desire a reasonable quality of life for yourself, as determined by you, not imposed on you by others. However, the so-called ‘community’ can become a progressively challenging place as cognitive capabilities decline.

‘Positive risk-taking’ is a concept well established by the Practice Based Evidence consultancy, and it applies equally to the risks a person living with dementia may wish to take, and to all of us who live in, work in and develop communities. The Joseph Rowntree Foundation commissioned a piece of work from a collaboration of Practice Based Evidence and the Mental Health Foundation to investigate how the concept of positive risk-taking may apply to the government initiative of developing dementia-friendly communities. The think piece is explored in the published ‘Viewpoint’ at the following link:

http://www.jrf.org.uk/publications/how-can-positive-risk-taking-help-build-dementia-friendly-communities

“Those with dementia are still people and they still have stories and they still have character and they’re all individuals and they’re all unique. And they just need to be interacted with on a human level.” [Carey Mulligan].

Check out ‘Still Alice’ as a great portrayal of the tragic descent into dementia, and the impact on a wider family as well as the person living with the condition.